Sacrifice – Etymology

This from etymonline:

sacrifice (n.)

late 13c., “offering of something (especially a life) to a deity as an act of propitiation or homage;” mid-14c., “that which is offered in sacrifice,” from Old French sacrifise “sacrifice, offering” (12c.), from Latin sacrificium, from sacrificus “performing priestly functions or sacrifices,” from sacra “sacred rites” (properly neuter plural of sacer “sacred;” see sacred) + combining form of facere “to make, to do” (from PIE root *dhe- “to set, put”).

Latin sacrificium is glossed in Old English by ansegdniss. Sense of “act of giving up one thing for another; something given up for the sake of another” is first recorded 1590s. Baseball sense first attested 1880.

sacrifice (v.)

c. 1300, “to offer something (to a deity, as a sacrifice),” from sacrifice (n.). Meaning “surrender, give up, suffer to be lost” is from 1706. Related: Sacrificed; sacrificing. Agent noun forms include sacrificer, sacrificator (both 16c., the latter from Latin); and sacrificulist (17c.).

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This from Wiktionary

sacrifice

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French sacrifice, from Latin sacrificium (“sacrifice”), from sacrificō (“make or offer a sacrifice”), from sacer (“sacred, holy”) + faciō (“do, make”).

Verb

sacrifice (third-person singular simple present sacrifices, present participle sacrificing, simple past and past participle sacrificed)

  • (transitive, intransitive) To offer (something) as a gift to a deity.
  • (transitive) To give away (something valuable) to get at least a possibility of gaining something else of value (such as self-respect, trust, love, freedom, prosperity), or to avoid an even greater loss.

Venison has many advantages over meat from factory farms, although it still requires a hunter to sacrifice the life of a deer.

  • (transitive) To trade (a value of higher worth) for something of lesser worth in order to gain something else valued more, such as an ally or business relationship, or to avoid an even greater loss; to sell without profit to gain something other than money.
  • (transitive, chess) To intentionally give up (a piece) in order to improve one’s position on the board.
  • (transitive, baseball) To advance (a runner on base) by batting the ball so it can be fielded, placing the batter out, but with insufficient time to put the runner out.
  • (dated, tradesmen’s slang) To sell at a price less than the cost or actual value.
  • To destroy; to kill.