esteem

From the Cambridge dictionary

Esteem

Noun UK

respect for or a good opinion of someone:

There has been a drop in public esteem for teachers.

Because of their achievements they were held in (= given) (high) esteem.

Verb UK

to respect someone or have a good opinion of them:

Her work is highly esteemed by all her colleagues.

[ + obj + noun/adj ] old-fashioned I would esteem (= consider) it a favour if you would accompany me.

Noun US

respect for or a good opinion of someone:

She has long been held in high esteem by the bankers who know her.

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From Collins Dictionary

Esteem

Word forms: 3rd person singular present tense esteems, present participle esteeming, past tense, past participle esteemed

1. uncountable noun

Esteem is the admiration and respect that you feel towards another person.

[formal]

He is held in high esteem by colleagues in the construction industry.

Their public esteem has never been lower.

He said he retained immense regard and esteem for the prime minister.

Synonyms: respect, regard, honour, consideration  

2. verb

If you esteem someone or something, you respect or admire them.

[formal]

I greatly esteem your message in the midst of our hard struggle.

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From Etymonline:

Esteem (v.)

mid-15c., from Old French estimer “to estimate, determine” (14c.), from Latin aestimare “to value, determine the value of, appraise,” perhaps ultimately from *ais-temos “one who cuts copper,” i.e. mints money (but de Vaan finds this “not very credible”). At first used as we would now use estimate; sense of “value, respect” is 1530s. Related: Esteemed; esteeming.

Esteem (n.)

(also steem, extyme), mid-14c., “account, value, worth,” from French estime, from estimer (see esteem (v.)). Meaning “high regard” is from 1610s.

Esteemed (adj.)

“held in high regard, respected, valued,” 1540s, past-participle adjective from esteem (v.).