The Method in Tibetan Buddhism

In studying the life of Milarepa, the Holy One of Tibet, who lived in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, A.D., we find it claimed for him that he attained union through the method of discipline, meditation and practice, and, ultimately, Illumination. We read as follows:

    “He was one, who, having mastered the mystic and occult sciences, had communicated to him… continuously the four blissful states of ecstatic communion…”

    “He was one, who having attained to omniscience, all-pervading goodwill, and glowing love, together with the acquisition of transcendental powers and virtues, became a self-developed Buddha who towered above all conflicting opinions and arguments of the various sects and creeds…”

    “He was a being most diligent and persevering in meditation upon the Rare Path… Having acquired full power over the mental states and faculties within, he overcame all dangers from the elements without…”

    “He was a being perfect in the practice of the four stages of meditation (analysis, reflection, fondness, bliss. These are the four progressive mental states, leading to complete concentration of mind, producing ecstatic illumination)…”

    “He was a most learned professor in the Science of the Mind, having proved the Mind to be, beyond dispute, the Beginning and End of all visible phenomena, both material and spiritual, the Rays whereof, being allowed to shine unobstructedly, develop themselves, as he knew, into the threefold [186] manifestation of the Universal Divine Being, through their own free, inherent power.”

    – Evans-Wentz, W. Y., Tibet’s Great Yogi, Milarepa, pages 32, 33, 35, 38.

Thus we have the same procedure – mental activity, contemplation, union and illumination.

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Excerpted from:

From Intellect to Intuition – Chapter Eight – The Universality of Meditation

By Alice Bailey